libertaria

old-prepper:

WE! ARE! IDIOTS!

fullmetalsachet:

seanmicha:

According to UNICEF: ”Nearly a billion people will enter the 21st century unable to read a book or sign their names and two thirds of them are women.”

People who don’t grow up as lifelong readers grow up in an America living under a form of de facto censorship and what it means is that the censor, by withholding library funding, limits access to reading materials to children from a young age. So they don’t get to see the other side of the coin and wind up developing a one-sided point of view which has been historically associated with sexism, homophobia, racial bigotry and other forms of intolerance and hate. If we don’t support libraries, we support going backwards in a type of devolution of the past which is exactly what the Tea Party types mean when they say they want their country back.

Sounds suspiciously, exactly like the America that the modern Republican Right wants us to grow up and grow old in.

freexcitizen:

Man that’s so fucked

ze-violet:

ze-violet:

emmanuelnegro:

coqbaroque:

hneeta:

curiositasmundi:

killingbambi:

(via Bioetica)
non che avessi bisogno di motivi per comprare il Mucchio, ma se qualcuno non ne ha questo è buono

ze-violet:

ze-violet:

emmanuelnegro:

coqbaroque:

hneeta:

curiositasmundi:

killingbambi:

(via Bioetica)

non che avessi bisogno di motivi per comprare il Mucchio, ma se qualcuno non ne ha questo è buono

taylarspoetica:

thepeoplesrecord:

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its historyDecember 5, 2013
It was an unprecedented headline in Iceland this week — a man shot to death by police.
"The nation was in shock. This does not happen in our country," said Thora Arnorsdottir, news editor at RUV, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service. 
She was referring to a 59-year old man who was shot by police on Monday. The man, who started shooting at police when they entered his building, had a history of mental illness. 
It’s the first time someone has been killed by armed police in Iceland since it became an independent republic in 1944. Police don’t even carry weapons, usually. Violent crime in Iceland is almost non-existent.
"The nation does not want its police force to carry weapons because it’s dangerous, it’s threatening," Arnorsdottir says. "It’s a part of the culture. Guns are used to go hunting as a sport, but you never see a gun."
In fact, Iceland isn’t anti-gun. In terms of per-capita gun ownership, Iceland ranks 15th in the world. Still, this incident was so rare that neighbors of the man shot were comparing the shooting to a scene from an American film. 
The Icelandic police department said officers involved will go through grief counseling. And the police department has already apologized to the family of the man who died — though not necessarily because they did anything wrong.
"I think it’s respectful," Arnorsdottir says, “because no one wants to take another person’s life. “
There are still a number of questions to be answered, including why police didn’t first try to negotiate with man before entering his building.
"A part of the great thing of living in this country is that you can enter parliament and the only thing they ask you to do is to turn off your cellphone, so you don’t disturb the parliamentarians while they’re talking. We do not have armed guards following our prime minister or president. That’s a part of the great thing of living in a peaceful society. We do not want to change that. " 
Source

can you even imagine if the u.s. mourned people killed by policelike a real national outpouringthat moment of silence should last for years

taylarspoetica:

thepeoplesrecord:

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its history
December 5, 2013

It was an unprecedented headline in Iceland this week — a man shot to death by police.

"The nation was in shock. This does not happen in our country," said Thora Arnorsdottir, news editor at RUV, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service. 

She was referring to a 59-year old man who was shot by police on Monday. The man, who started shooting at police when they entered his building, had a history of mental illness. 

It’s the first time someone has been killed by armed police in Iceland since it became an independent republic in 1944. Police don’t even carry weapons, usually. Violent crime in Iceland is almost non-existent.

"The nation does not want its police force to carry weapons because it’s dangerous, it’s threatening," Arnorsdottir says. "It’s a part of the culture. Guns are used to go hunting as a sport, but you never see a gun."

In fact, Iceland isn’t anti-gun. In terms of per-capita gun ownership, Iceland ranks 15th in the world. Still, this incident was so rare that neighbors of the man shot were comparing the shooting to a scene from an American film. 

The Icelandic police department said officers involved will go through grief counseling. And the police department has already apologized to the family of the man who died — though not necessarily because they did anything wrong.

"I think it’s respectful," Arnorsdottir says, “because no one wants to take another person’s life. “

There are still a number of questions to be answered, including why police didn’t first try to negotiate with man before entering his building.

"A part of the great thing of living in this country is that you can enter parliament and the only thing they ask you to do is to turn off your cellphone, so you don’t disturb the parliamentarians while they’re talking. We do not have armed guards following our prime minister or president. That’s a part of the great thing of living in a peaceful society. We do not want to change that. " 

Source

can you even imagine if the u.s. mourned people killed by police
like a real national outpouring
that moment of silence should last for years